The sugar plantation grew to be 36,000 acres
across Maui’s central valley. This means that
the plantation is 25 percent larger than the
island of Kaho‘olawe.

One acre of “seed cane” will grow into 7 acres
of sugarcane.

Immigrants from China, Japan, Korea, Portugal, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines communicated with one another by speaking pidgin, a language that drew from their diverse backgrounds.

Each new harvest would start with a blessing. Blessings have been given by Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, and other religious leaders.

The “Planting Gang” could plant up to 100 acres of sugar cane a day.

Early field worker men could carry up to 200 lbs of cane in a single load on their shoulder!

It took early field worker women 30 minutes to dress for work. They had to protect themselves from sharp cane leaves, centipedes and scorpions, dust and hot sun.

The mill whistle began blowing at 4:30 a.m. to start the workday

The HC&S plantation attempted other crops besides sugar: cacao, papaya, bamboo, mango and sugar beets, to name a few.

Geese were imported during the 1950s to eat the thistle weed that competed against sugarcane in the fields.

The sugar plantation grew to be 36,000 acres
across Maui’s central valley. This means that
the plantation is 25 percent larger than the
island of Kaho‘olawe.

One acre of “seed cane” will grow into 7 acres
of sugarcane.

Immigrants from China, Japan, Korea, Portugal, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines communicated with one another by speaking pidgin, a language that drew from their diverse backgrounds.

Each new harvest would start with a blessing. Blessings have been given by Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, and other religious leaders.

The “Planting Gang” could plant up to 100 acres of sugar cane a day.

Early field worker men could carry up to 200 lbs of cane in a single load on their shoulder!

It took early field worker women 30 minutes to dress for work. They had to protect themselves from sharp cane leaves, centipedes and scorpions, dust and hot sun.

The mill whistle began blowing at 4:30 a.m. to start the workday

The HC&S plantation attempted other crops besides sugar: cacao, papaya, bamboo, mango and sugar beets, to name a few.

Geese were imported during the 1950s to eat the thistle weed that competed against sugarcane in the fields.


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